Young Scholars in Writing: Announcements https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">MISSION STATEMENT</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing: Undergraduate Research in Writing and Rhetoric</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> is a refereed journal dedicated to publishing research articles written by undergraduates in a wide variety of disciplines associated with rhetoric and writing. It is guided by these central beliefs: 1) That research can and should be a crucial component of rhetorical education; 2) that undergraduates engaged in research about writing and rhetoric should have opportunities to share their work with a broader audience of students, scholars, and teachers through national and international publication; and 3) that the fuller the range of voices, rhetorics, and subjects the research of our field includes, the more we learn and the stronger we become. </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> is intended to be a resource for students engaged in undergraduate research and for scholars who are interested in new advances or theories relating to language, composition, rhetoric, and related fields.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Focus and Scope</strong> <br><em>Young Scholars in Writing: Undergraduate Research in Writing and Rhetoric</em> is an international peer-reviewed journal. It publishes research and theoretical articles by undergraduates of all majors and years on the subjects of rhetoric, writing, writers, discourse, language, and related topics.</span></p> en-US Blog: Young Scholars in Writing Peer Review Process https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/23 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As part of the application to publish articles in </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, undergraduate researchers are required to undergo a peer review process to ensure their research is a good fit for the journal. Peer reviewers come from many backgrounds, including students in writing related courses and previously published </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> authors. In total, almost 40 students from across the country served as peer reviewers for the first round of manuscript review for volume 19. Peer reviewers are asked to consider six criteria for publication: fit for YSW specifically, engagement in a conversation with writing studies scholarship, the presence of a clear focus and argument, inclusion of a clear explanation of choices or methods, logical organization, and the ability to make an impact.To find out how these peer reviewers felt about the process, we asked some of them about their experience reading and reviewing current manuscripts that were submitted for consideration</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Catie Pfeiffer (she/her) first got involved with </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">via the writing center at Hofstra University. She noted that her director, Andrea Efthymiou, told her about the opportunity to be a peer reviewer at a staff meeting, which sounded interesting to her. While reading through the manuscripts she was assigned, Catie focused on “looking for current and/or cultural relevance from the research.” She read one manuscript about the COVID-19 pandemic, and another about social media use in school and the workplace. She explained, “I thought both of these topics seemed really relevant and interesting, and these were some of the main factors that I found to be important when reviewing.” After participating in the peer review process, Catie realized that undergraduate students’s work can be very impressive. She was surprised by the amount of thought and work put into each article, stating, “ I could never imagine myself being capable of putting together a 20+ page research paper like this, so I was really amazed by all of the good work that I got the opportunity to read. I also learned that maybe I am capable of writing a manuscript like these as long as I find a topic that interests me enough.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Megan Kelley (she/her) had her article, </span><a href="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/article/view/318"><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Use #YouKnowMe and share your truth”: Rhetoric of Digital Abortion Storytelling</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, published in volume 18 of </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">. She used her prior knowledge as a </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">author to inform her peer review process, noting “I used the comments I received [while writing my article] to help guide me in how to do peer-reviewing. When reading through the manuscripts, I focused on things that I knew were important to change as well as things that would be an interesting publication.” When deciding whether or not to recommend a manuscript to be published, Megan considered a few factors. “I was looking for the topic to be new/innovative/interesting and the methods to appropriately support the topic. I was also looking to make sure that there were no glaring grammatical errors or citation errors because that indicates that the author may not have done serious editing and revision before submitting.” Looking for these elements during the peer review process can help the journal editors decide which manuscripts will be published in the next volume of YSW. Reading through submitted manuscripts can be a learning experience, Megan noted. She said, “There are a lot of talented young writers! The manuscripts I read were incredibly interesting and I was glad I got the opportunity to read them, regardless of if they are published or not.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Jalil Dixon (he/him) is a student at York College of Pennsylvania. During his peer review process, he focused on whether manuscript authors organized their ideas effectively. He also scanned the manuscripts for “how relevant and impactful their sources were, and how relevant the actual topic was.” He mentioned that it was important to match the topic of the manuscript to the goals of the journal, and look for “what it could bring to the next edition of </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">.” Jalil noted that participating in the peer review process helped him learn the value of the practice. He noted, “It's certainly an important aspect of the writing process because it's a chance to have your manuscript read and analyzed before it's actually released to the public. Without it, it could be very difficult to ensure that you are putting out your best work possible.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s easy to see why potential </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> authors go through the peer review process. Having other undergraduate students and previous </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> authors read submitted manuscripts allows them to give valuable feedback that not only helps the manuscript authors, but also aids the journal editors in deciding which manuscripts to move forward to be reviewed by Faculty Advisory Editors. If you would like to learn more about how undergraduate researchers publish their work in </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, click this link to read our </span><a href="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/information/authors"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Information for Authors</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> web page.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Blog post by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</span></em></p> <p><br><br></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-05-07 Blog: Meet the Editorial Intern: Beck Liberatore https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/22 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hello! My name is Beck Liberatore (they/them) and I have been the Spring 2021 Editorial Intern for </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> since February. I am writing this article to give a bit of insight into what it’s like to be an intern for the journal, and hopefully encourage some undergraduate students to apply for the position for the Fall 2021 Semester.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">I became involved with </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> because my senior research class was cancelled due to low enrollment. Students who needed to take the required course were suggested to take either one of a few possible courses or an internship. The editors of </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> had been talking about the journal both in and out of classes, so I had heard the name quite a few times. When I got an email that they were looking for an intern, I rushed to update my resume and apply. A few days later, I received the news that I was selected to be the intern! I was so excited to work with the lovely team of people that I already knew from my previous years at York College of Pennsylvania.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As the Editorial Intern, my responsibilities included creating and posting images and captions on social media accounts, attending weekly meetings, interviewing student researchers and Faculty Advisory Editors, reading through the current volume of </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, and writing, editing, and publishing blog posts for our website. I had a lot of fun working with others over email and Zoom during the past few months, as I was working remotely. Meeting with the editorial team every week helped me plan my workload and check in about current projects, and also allowed for a bit of socialization (which was greatly appreciated!)&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One of my main responsibilities as the Editorial Intern is making posts on Instagram and Facebook. I created posts that aimed to spotlight the amazing individuals who were involved with the most recent volume, such as undergraduate student researchers and their Faculty Advisory Editors. I also made a few posts to remind followers about important upcoming dates, such as the day that Volume 18 went live on the website and the submission deadline for Volume 19.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">I have enjoyed working with Drs. Cutrufello, Cope, and Peck over the past few months to promote the most recent volume of the journal and create more engagement on its social media accounts. We clearly saw the results of my efforts when we created a poster for the Student Research Showcase on April 19th. The Instagram and Facebook engagement had increased significantly over the course of just two and a half months, and posts were receiving more shares, comments, and likes than ever before. It was rewarding to see the numerical results, but what really surprised me was the large amount of positive comments I received from my peers, professors, and the Editors themselves. It made me feel proud of my hard work to hear what they had to say.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One of the challenges I faced during my time as the editorial intern for </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> was learning how to use the OSJ website software. I had some previous experience editing and posting on an existing website from a class I took last semester, Publications Management with Dr. Travis Kurowski. However, I experienced a few hiccups when first learning to use the interface and blog/announcement system. However, I got familiar with the website fairly quickly, and now I feel confident using the system.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Overall, I would highly recommend working as an editorial intern for </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">. I have learned a lot and gained valuable experience from this internship, which I am sure will help me post-graduation in the working world. Now I just have to make it through the next two weeks and my graduation ceremony!&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/gaybeckk.jpg" alt="" width="304" height="228"></span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Blog post by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</span></em></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-04-30 Blog: Meet the author: Nidhi Gandhi https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/21 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Nidhi Gandhi (she/her) is an undergraduate student at Hofstra University She was one of the first undergraduate researchers to publish a methodological reflection in </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">. She noted that her article was “a first-hand reflection of conducting an empirical study as an undergraduate student[where] I talked about the challenges I faced during the drafting process of creating a survey, learning about Qualtrics and also recruiting faculty as well as needing their help to recruit students.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Nidhi was introduced to </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">by her mentor, Dr. Andrea Rosso Efthymiou. She recalled that they were at the Naylor Workshop where the YSW editors made an announcement about submitting an article to everyone who was there. For a while afterward, she didn’t think much about the journal. Later on, Nidhi and Dr. Efthymiou attended the Mid-Atlantic Writing Center Association (MAWCA) conference in Baltimore, Maryland in 2019, and decided to go to the </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">pre-conference workshop. She recalled, “Andrea whispered to me that I should write a methodological reflection because I wasn't at the phase of writing any results (I hadn't even conducted my study yet). After I surveyed and interviewed my participants, I told Andrea about some of the responses I had gotten and she encouraged me to write my reflection.” Feeling grateful, she noted, “I owe Andrea a lot. She gave me a resume.”</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Being one of the first to publish a methodological reflection in </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">meant that Nidhi had to make a few changes to her writing process. She noted that she experienced a bit of a learning curve when writing with a lot of Writing Studies jargon. She noted, “A lot of my writing, even the most academic writing, has some sort of personal element especially since I'm a big proponent of using the personal voice. Even when I use the third person, some level of first-person is in the writing.” This was also Nidhi’s first time being published, so she didn’t know much about the process. She learned a lot from the experience, and joked, “I think there should be a methodological reflection on writing a methodological reflection!”&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Nidhi noted that her biggest challenge with publishing her article was trying to understand what the expectations were of both the editors and the publication itself, while still maintaining her own vision for the article. She noted, “I had never been published before so trying to navigate that process was difficult.” Additionally, since the Methodological Reflection category is new to the journal, she couldn’t “just read previously published works to get a sense of what should be in the reflection. I remember Dr. Peck and I talked about how I was helping her, Dr. Cutrufello and Dr. Cope visualize what this genre should be as well. So, all of that was cool. It was challenging but definitely rewarding!”</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another reward of publishing her work was seeing her name and her article finally published. Nidhi exclaimed that seeing her work in its final form “was magnificent!” She also said that “getting the ‘we are interested in publishing your piece’ letter last year” at the beginning of the process made her feel like a real researcher. She said, “In my reflection, I wrote about how I wanted to do something and prove my worth, so seeing this come to fruition was unbelievable!”&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Nidhi said she would “absolutely recommend” other undergraduate researchers to work with </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing. </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">She mentioned “I just think it's so cool that the editors decided to create a whole new genre, because with traditional study-results articles, we're seeing the final product but never get to know about the painstaking labor that researchers go through just to conduct a study. So, having this space to talk about the messiness is really beneficial for researchers so they can just say, ‘yeah this was hard, but I also did it cuz I'm awesome!’” Nidhi noted the importance of this representation, stating, “those kinds of stories can really help people keep going, especially when they want to give up.”&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/ysw.jpg" alt="" width="253" height="337"></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Blog post by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</span></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-04-20 Blog: Meet the Faculty Advisory Editor: Steven Price https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/20 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Steven Price is a Professor in the Department of English and Philosophy at Mississippi College in Clinton, MS, teaching primarily in the Writing and English Secondary Education tracks. He is also one of the Faculty Advisory Editors for Volume 18 of </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">. Price worked with Jessica Brown to edit her article,</span><a href="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/article/view/322"><span style="font-weight: 400;"> “Identifying and Categorizing Language Discrimination in the Legal Field.”</span></a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brown, an undergraduate student from Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, researched how attorneys recognized legal discrimination in their work. While Price has not done his own research into legal discourse, he was able to recognize some of the concepts as many students in his discourse classes chose to study legal topics. Though unfamiliar with the topic, Price was experienced with the methods that Brown chose. He stated, “I have background in Jessica’s interview methodology and experience in Critical Discourse Analysis. So, was I familiar with her topic?--not so much. But the background and methodology, yes.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Price decided to become a Faculty Advisory Editor due to </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">’s reputation. He knew a few FAEs who spoke highly of the journal and their experience mentoring students. The FAEs were a close community of researchers and teachers, and these connections appealed to Price. Joe Janangelo, an FAE from Loyola University, had introduced Price to the editor of the journal at the time, Jane Greer, at the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC). Price noted that Greer “made a great pitch at CCCC,” which sold him on the idea and made him feel excited to join the other FAEs.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Time and motivation were the two big challenges that Price and Brown faced while working on her article. Price mentioned how potentially draining the process can be for students, “These are projects they've worked on for a long time, students put a lot of work into them and want to be done with them.” To combat this, he noted that FAEs are there to help students “strategize and prioritize to make their work more efficient.” Because many students adapt their articles from previous school projects, they may not initially fit the mold of the journal. Price stressed that “We don't want students to redo their projects, just reshape them for the context of a writing journal.” With the help of an FAE, students are able to fit their research into the genre of a scholarly article.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">FAEs reap a lot of rewards from the process of mentoring undergraduate researchers. Price mentioned the value of learning about students' topics, their research experiences, and interacting with them and their advisors from their home schools. He noted that being an FAE “is a form of professional development in an enjoyable way.” He appreciates that he gets to collaborate with researchers and apply what he learns to his own courses.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Because they lived in different states, Price and Brown mainly communicated online while working on her article. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, both Price and Brown were used to using Zoom calls, so they used those as their main form of contact. Price noted that because of their familiarity with the program, the calls “went smoothly.” The two also used emails to communicate in between calls.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Price would advise faculty who are interested in mentoring undergraduate researchers to get involved with the journal. He stated, “Your own teaching and research grows from the collaborations with students and faculty.” He also suggested reading </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW, </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">noting that “It’s a legitimate research journal. You can learn from it as faculty and your students can learn from it in your courses.” Because of the wide range of topics contained in the students’ research articles, the journal can be applied to many different types of courses.</span> <span style="font-weight: 400;">Price wanted to recognize Brown, saying “I’m proud of the impact of Jessica’s article. It was obvious from the first reading that her topic is timely and important.” Since George Floyd’s death there has been a lot of discussion about racial discrimination, including in courts and the rest of the legal system. “Jessica’s project shows how these were not just murders on the street, but there was racially driven discrimination in the courts as well,” he explained. “Jessica’s ability to communicate her research makes it digestible, so that everyday people are able to read it and become moved by it. It’s an important article to have out there.” Brown and other undergraduate researchers are clearly invested in changing the world, one article at a time.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you are interested in becoming an FAE for </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing, </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">please reach out to us at </span><a href="mailto:youngscholars.editor@gmail.com"><span style="font-weight: 400;">youngscholars.editor@gmail.com</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> for more information.</span></p> <p><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/price.jpg" alt="" width="326" height="217"></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Blog post by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</span></em></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-04-08 Meet the Faculty Advisory Editor: Sarah Singer https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/19 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sarah Singer (she/her) is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Central Florida as well as one of the many Faculty Advisory Editors that worked with undergraduate researchers for Volume 18 of </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">. Singer advised Samantha Rae, author of </span><a href="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/article/view/320"><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Tales in Language, Confidence, and Learning Environments: Exploring Students’ Mental Health Through Literacy Narratives.”</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Samantha’s research focused on mental health rhetoric, which is part of the larger field of RHM- rhetoric of health and medicine. Singer has published several articles within this field, which are about Lyme disease, diabetes, and health and medical-related research and how it can intersect with English Studies. Because they were both interested in the field, Singer had a great time working with the “brilliant and fantastic” Rae.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Part of Singer’s great appraisal of Rae comes from the interesting perspective she took when conducting her research. “Many people look at the Digital Archive of Literacy Narratives to better understand people’s literacy learning experiences, but Sam looked at DALN to see how mental health issues and rhetorics intersected with those experiences,” Singer noted. This unique perspective shows one of many possibilities for conducting research using DALN.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I have a lot of experience working with narratives,” Singer noted. She continued, “Sam’s article focuses on literacy narratives, and much of my research focuses on illness narratives or stories about diagnosis, treatment, coping, and living with a chronic health condition or disability. Working with Sam prompted me to learn a lot more about mental health rhetoric. The new journal, </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rhetoric of Health and Medicine</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, had a number of articles that were useful for learning about this subfield.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Singer is the author of “</span><a href="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/article/view/157"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Beyond the Domestic Sphere: Home Economics and the Education of Women at Maryland State College, 1916–94</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">” published in Volume 10 of </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, which was very exciting as it was her first time publishing her work. Singer, as an undergraduate, had a positive experience working with her Faculty Advisory Editor, Paige Banaji. She noted, “Dr. Banaji sent me lengthy written feedback every two weeks, and I appreciated that she took my research so seriously. I used my </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> article as my writing sample for graduate school, and knowing that I’d worked so closely with Dr. Banaji on it made me feel confident. Through that experience, I learned a lot about giving and receiving feedback, asking questions, and writing clear prose.” So it was no surprise that when Editor Jane Greer offered Singer an FAE position, she “couldn’t say no.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Singer explained, “Dr. Greer was the first person who made me feel like I was a ‘real’ scholar outside of my faculty mentors at University of Maryland. After I published in YSW, she sent me a very encouraging email that explained that my research was valuable and advanced the field of feminist rhetorical historiography. At the time, I was graduating from the University of Maryland and had just committed to the Ph.D. program at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Greer’s email boosted my confidence so much. I saved her email and looked at it regularly during my first few years of graduate school, especially during moments when I wasn’t feeling as confident.” She inspired Singer, who said “I love working with undergraduate researchers because it makes me feel like I can invite people into the realm of scholarly research, which can feel very exclusive. I aim to open potential doors for them, or show them how to open them.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One challenge that Singer and Sam faced during their editing process was scope. “Sam had a lot of potential things to investigate, and many potential narratives. We worked together to fit her project to a (necessarily) limited scope. Research can take you in many different directions, and quickly become a book length project. We needed to pick something that could be studied in the scope of an article.” The overall experience was enjoyable, though, as both parties got to interact with people from different universities, and “see the awesome work they're doing, in a way that isn’t connected to grade.” Singer also mentioned that </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> articles aren’t as limited by time as normal semester-long projects, which allows students to polish their research to present it to those outside of their own school.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Singer and Sam spoke on the phone every Monday for 20-30 minutes “to catch up on how her work was unfolding and so that [Singer] could answer any questions in real-time.” They also corresponded over email when Sam had questions between meetings, and to talk about Sam’s evolving draft. Singer noted, “I felt that it was important to be as encouraging as possible and to give Sam a lot of positive feedback—after all, she was taking on an ambitious scholarly project that required her to significantly revise her initial draft.” The two discussed the process of giving and receiving feedback, “which can be difficult for experienced scholars (myself included!),” she exclaimed.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br></span> <span style="font-weight: 400;">Singer encourages faculty to assume the role of FAEs, stating “If you’re offered the opportunity, do it.” She loved supporting Sam and her work, and became inspired by all the undergraduates' research and all their new ideas. She noted, “As a faculty member, I sometimes get tunnel vision when it comes to research because I’ve been doing it for a while—even as a junior faculty member—and working with smart, engaged undergraduate students like Sam helps me remember to think outside the box.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/singer.jpg" alt="" width="220" height="315"></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you are interested in becoming an FAE for </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing, </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">please reach out to us at </span><a href="mailto:youngscholars.editor@gmail.com"><span style="font-weight: 400;">youngscholars.editor@gmail.com</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> for more information.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Blog post by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</span></em></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-04-06 Blog: Meet the Faculty Advisory Editor: Rebekah Sims https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/18 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rebekah Sims (she/her) is a current PhD candidate at Purdue University. This summer, she will join the School of Education faculty at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland, UK. For Volume 18, Sims worked as a Faculty Advisory Editor (FAE)&nbsp; and mentor to Gabriela Uribe, who wrote the article </span><a href="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/article/view/323"><span style="font-weight: 400;">“¿Por Qué no Sabes Español?”: Pressured Monolingualism and Its Impacts on Mexican Americans.</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> The two worked together via a combination of asynchronous emails, comments on drafts, and online exchanging of articles and resources.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sims was already familiar with Gaby’s area of study when they started working together, as she specializes in empirical research methods and multilingual and intercultural pedagogy. Gaby’s article employed empirical research to the topics of multilingual development and public policy, so the two were able to work well together.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sims had her article, </span><a href="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/article/view/152"><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Discursive Agency and Collective Action among Lubavitch Hasidic Women,”</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> published in </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Volume 10. After publishing her own work, editor Jane Greer asked her to be a peer reviewer. Rebekah served in the role for two years, while teaching public high school.. Several years later, while at Purdue, Sims contacted the new editor of </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">and asked to be involved with the journal again. She noted, “I enjoy working with the journal because I think the mission of supporting excellent undergrad research in writing and rhetoric is so important. I became an FAE because I wanted to further this mission and mentor young researchers. I’ve also loved getting to experience </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> from every point of view: as an undergraduate who was mentored and published, a peer reviewer, and now a faculty advisor. I want to pass on to others what I experienced through the journal as an undergrad researcher myself.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are always some challenges when mentoring students. Sims noted, “One of the most challenging -- and enjoyable -- parts of mentoring students is creating highly individualized feedback that meets writers where they are in the research project. Sometimes, this has meant intensively assisting with research methods and data analysis. At other times, it has meant helping the student review relevant literature to more carefully anchor the research in writing and rhetoric, or helping students become clearer writers.” Sims is always eager to overcome the obstacles that arise during mentoring students, and help them gain more confidence in their work.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sims finds being an FAE very rewarding. She explained, “I find seeing students grow as researchers in the field of rhetoric and build confidence in their research and writing skills the most rewarding part. I also find it rewarding to see how strong their contributions to our field are.” She truly believes that we should support young researchers in order to better the fields of writing and rhetoric.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When asked if she had any advice for faculty interested in mentoring undergraduate researchers, Sims encouraged them to support students in effective professionalization that prepares them for their desired career pathways. She insisted, “When we mentor students, we need to make sure that we don’t impose one narrow pathway (such as immediate entry to graduate school) on undergrad researchers. Instead, we should listen to students’ interests, and target our mentoring toward their goals, whether that is working in an industry, a public sector position such as public education, or eventual entry into a graduate program. Undergraduate research experiences build valuable skills for a wide variety of career pathways.” By focusing on each student’s individual goals, mentors can enrich their academic experience as well as equip young writers to contribute essential scholarship to the field of writing and rhetoric.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">&nbsp;Finally, Sims would like to say that becoming an FAE is one of the most rewarding aspects of her professional life. She highly recommends the experience, particularly for experienced scholars who are vocationally committed to mentoring new scholars.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you are interested in becoming an FAE for </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing, </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">please reach out to us at </span><a href="mailto:youngscholars.editor@gmail.com"><span style="font-weight: 400;">youngscholars.editor@gmail.com</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> for more information.</span></p> <p><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/r-for-hilary.jpg" alt="" width="283" height="345"></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Blog post by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</span></em></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-04-01 Blog: Meet the Faculty Advisory Editor: Sarah Polo https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/17 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sarah Polo (she/her) is an Assistant Professor and First-Year Writing Program coordinator at Cottey College, a private women’s liberal arts college located in Nevada, Missouri. She is also one of the Faculty Advisory Editors (FAEs) of Volume 18 of the </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Journal. Polo worked with Anna Maltbie on her research project, “</span><a href="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/article/view/319"><span style="font-weight: 400;">‘Stories for Reproductive Freedom’: A Rhetorical Analysis of Storytelling on NARAL Pro-Choice America’s Website</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though she was at first unfamiliar with Anna’s research topic, Polo realized the similarities between the two researchers’ work. She noted, “I look at women’s experiences in higher education, specifically women students attending college in the very early part of the 20th century, so I was able to help with the women &amp; gender lens. But even more importantly, I think, is that my own research involves examining archives of women’s writings, and I think the work Anna was doing was very much about examining an archive of women’s stories and lived experiences.” Because they were both interested in womens’ experiences, the two worked well together.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Polo was first introduced to </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">in 2014 by Professor Jane Greer, who was the sole editor of the journal at that time. Polo, a graduate student and research assistant for Greer, became familiar with </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> all those years ago. She said, “My initial introduction involved indexing back issues and copyediting the current volume of the journal. While I was doing that, I really loved getting to read the research of such smart, insightful undergraduate researchers.” After assisting Jane Greer, Polo used </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">to teach her own undergraduate students about research methods, conducting interviews, and the academic article genre. “I pull a lot of examples from the journal,” she stated. When Polo became an assistant professor, Greer mentioned the opportunity of becoming an FAE for the journal.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are challenges that come with being an FAE, as with all things. Polo mentioned that effective time management was the biggest challenge that she and Anna faced. She noted that “Faculty and students all have busy lives, and so one of the initial challenges might just be figuring out a timeline and set of steps that is feasible for both parties.” However, overcoming this obstacle can lead to rewarding results. Polo noted that helping students take steps towards publishing their work is a cool process. She noted, “You get to watch them take a piece from something that’s perhaps just been seen by their professor and classmates to something that can circulate within the larger world and to a wider scholarly audience.” Students also benefit from this process, as they can apply their work to a larger scale than they would for a school project.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Polo and Anna initially met on a Zoom call, to help them see each other as real people, not just names on a screen. After that, they communicated via email, circulating drafts of Anna’s article and checking in on her progress. The communication was integral to improving Anna’s draft, and she “was very responsive to emails and receptive to feedback; I could tell that she genuinely wanted to make her piece better.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Polo would like to encourage anyone thinking of becoming an FAE to do so. “It’s so worth the time,” she noted. She encouraged potential FAEs to have a good perspective of their role in the process: “You should be a mentor, and think of it as being a collaborator. It's the student’s research, so as their mentor you don’t want to try to remake the student in your own image as a scholar, or have them revise the article to be exactly what you would write.” She mentioned the transition of genres from essays to academic papers as the goal of the interaction. Mentors should help students “make their work fit the genre of an academic article.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Polo would like to conclude by stating that she gets just as much benefit from the process as her students. She often takes what she learns from the students’ research and methods and applies it to her own work. She exclaimed, “working with undergraduate researchers makes me both a better researcher, writer, and mentor myself!” Polo noted that her experience helping students revise for </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">makes her think about ways to improve her own writing, for example, making her writing style as accessible as possible.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you are interested in becoming an FAE for </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing, </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">please reach out to us at </span><a href="mailto:youngscholars.editor@gmail.com"><span style="font-weight: 400;">youngscholars.editor@gmail.com</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> for more information.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/polo.jpg" alt="" width="402" height="268"></span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Blog post by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</span></em></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-03-30 What We Do and Don't Publish https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/16 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to our website, </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Young Scholars in Writing: Undergraduate Research in Writing and Rhetoric</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> publishes research articles written by undergraduates on topics related to rhetoric and writing.” But what does that mean? This post will help prospective authors determine if </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> is the right venue to share their research.&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> publishes four types of articles:</span></p> <p><strong>Research Articles</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> integrate secondary sources and primary research to explore the subjects of rhetoric, writing, writers, discourse, language and related topics. These articles should make an original intellectual contribution to their respective fields. To support methodological diversity, </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> is especially interested in submissions that rely on primary research and/or empirical methods. These articles should be 10-25 double-spaced pages in length. Here are some examples of research articles from Volume 18:</span></p> <ul> <li class="show" style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><a href="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/article/view/318"><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Use #YouKnowMe and share your truth”: Rhetoric of Digital Abortion Storytelling</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> by Megan Kelley</span></li> <li class="show" style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><a href="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/article/view/326"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Materiality Matters: How Human Bodies and Writing Technologies Impact the Composing Process</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> by Brittany Halley</span></li> </ul> <p><strong>First-Year Spotlight</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> articles are original research articles about writing and rhetoric written by first-year students. These articles should also present original and intellectual contributions to their respective fields. First-Year Spotlight articles should be 5-25 pages double spaced. For an example of this kind of article, check out Huy Gia Troung’s </span><a href="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/article/view/327"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Visual Rhetoric in Medical Illustrations and the Implications in Medical Practices</span></a></p> <p><strong>Comment &amp; Response</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> articles provide commentary on an article from a previous volume of </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW. </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">These articles should be 2-5 double-spaced pages, focus on presenting an argument in response to the previous article, and use new or additional sources to back up the argument. For an example of this kind of article, check out Noah Bolls’ </span><a href="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/article/view/330"><span style="font-weight: 400;">“For all of us”: Feminine Style in the Rhetoric of Rosalynn Carter</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><strong>Methodological Reflection</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> articles should include a detailed narrative of and reflect on empirical methods used in the process of a current research project. These articles should be 3-8 double-spaced pages long, and must use and cite literature focusing on research methods. For an example of this kind of article, read Angela Myers’ </span><a href="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/article/view/328"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Creating Impact through User-Centered Research</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">does not publish:</span></p> <ul> <li class="show" style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Undergraduate research on topics not related to writing studies or rhetoric&nbsp;</span></li> <li class="show" style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Analysis of literature or literary criticism</span></li> <li class="show" style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Analysis of films, music, etc. that is not explicitly grounded in rhetorical scholarship</span></li> <li class="show" style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Opinion pieces on academic practices or culture, etc</span></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are lots of other great publication venues for undergraduate research. If your piece does not fit within the scope of what </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> publishes, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">you might consider the following journals that publish a wider range of undergraduate research topics: </span><a href="http://www.jurpress.org/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Journal of Undergraduate Research</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, </span><a href="https://qc-writers.com/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Queen City Writers</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, </span><a href="http://www.apollonejournal.org/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Apollon Undergraduate eJournal</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, or </span><a href="https://www.inquiriesjournal.com/submissions"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Inquiries</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><br><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you are unsure whether your article is a good fit for </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW, </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">please email youngscholars.editor@gmail.com with a summary of your article and any questions you may have. </span></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-03-25 Blog: Meet the author: Noah Bolls https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/15 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Write about something you are genuinely interested in. Don't be afraid to try it out. The process isn’t as scary as everyone thinks it is and rejection isn’t a big deal,” said Noah Bolls, sophomore and author of a review article Young Scholars in Writing (YSW) volume 18. In an interview with Noah about his comment and response essay “‘For all of us’: Feminine Style in the Rhetoric of Rosalynn Carter,”</span> <span style="font-weight: 400;">he explained the key to writing is in finding a topic you really enjoy. “It started as an assignment for a communications class,” Noah revealed, but it was a topic that he wanted to dig into more. His essay responds to Marie Whelan’s YSW article “</span><a href="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/article/view/205"><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Woman of Power: Rosalynn Carter and the Mental Health Scene</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">” (volume 12). Noah’s work is both a response to Whelan’s paper and an analysis of First Lady Rosalynn Carter’s language.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The biggest challenge I faced was not having access to the original sources,” commented Noah, who struggled to find digital copies of documents and books during remote learning. He ended waiting until he was back on campus to get the hard copies from his school library. “I had to find other sources, dig for information,” Noah explained.&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Noah’s </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> essay began as a college assignment and grew from there. “I was encouraged by my professors to submit [my work] to </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">,” said Noah. At first, Noah didn’t think past the excitement of having his work accepted and published but soon found out there was more to it. After acceptance by </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, there is an editing process to help the authors grow and strengthen their work. “The editing process helped me to focus on my own argument…. to not get stuck in what the original author said, and to focus more on my response to the work.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One of Noah’s biggest surprises through the writing and revision process was how much his thinking changed about his subject. Although his essay uses the theory of “feminine style” to analyze Carter’s rhetoric, through revision he realized his framework was somewhat “reductive.”&nbsp; He believes the rhetorical theory he was using, one taught to him in the classroom, is somewhat outdated and may not be applicable in modern contexts.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><br><span style="font-weight: 400;">The revision and editing process with </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> was not only helpful in streamlining his paper to make a stronger argument, but it also made him less nervous about publishing in general. He loved the experience and working with the people who helped him. “I think more people should try it.” In fact, Noah enjoyed the process so much that he said “I’m definitely going to do it again.” Noah’s overall career goals are uncertain. As a sophomore English major at Willamette University, his work with </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> has him rethinking his career goals. “I might stay in Academia,” he said, “maybe teach,” but he’s unsure. The base for his future, however, is his desire to keep writing.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/bolls-noah.jpg" alt="" width="212" height="212"></span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Blog post by students in Dr. Emily Murphy Cope’s Fall 2020 Digital Writing course (WRT320 at York College of Pennsylvania).&nbsp;</span></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Edited by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</span></em></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-03-18 Meet the author: Angela Myers https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/14 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Angela Myers is the author of “Creating Impact through User-Centered Research,” a methodological reflection published in the latest volume of </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">. Myers is currently a senior Professional Writing and Rhetoric major at Elon University. After college, she hopes to teach English in Spain, but her long term goal is to earn a PhD in rhetoric or communications.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Myers’ YSW study grew from a gap she saw in the research on the rhetoric of sexual violence programs on college campuses. “There’s a lot of research on psychology and public health,” she said, “and that’s kind of how I came to the topic of researching the rhetoric of sexual violence prevention courses on college campuses.” Myers got the idea of a user-centered study from her faculty mentor, Dr. Jessie Moore (Elon University), who was a proponent of this approach to research. Myers explains the value of user-centered research: “I think especially for an issue that is so sensitive and is kind of related to social justice and society as a whole, it’s really important to be user-centered because you have to take into consideration what the user’s needs are when it comes to issues like this.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Prior to her </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> article, Myers was already a published author, having published research on rhetoric in Spanish while studying abroad in Argentina. She first heard about </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> when she attended the 2019 </span><a href="https://www.ycp.edu/about-us/offices-and-departments/center-for-community-engagement/workshop-for-undergraduate-research-in-writing-studies/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Naylor Workshop for Undergraduate Research in Writing Studies</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“With </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing,</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> I really liked how structured [the publication process] was,” Myers said. “I felt like I got a lot of mentorship from the editors.” In particular, Myers enjoyed working with her YSW Faculty Advisory Editor, Dr. Kim Fahle Peck, who directs the Writing Center at York College of Pennsylvania. Working with Dr. Peck “was a really great experience,” according to Myers. “We zoomed a couple of times about the research, and she gave a lot of really great feedback…. I liked how she not only told me what revisions to make, but also taught me how to go about making those revisions in the future, or why those revisions would be appropriate for the academic journal genre.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The best thing Myers learned through the publication process was, in her opinion, how to revise a paper for an academic journal. “It’s one thing to read [an academic journal] and another thing to try and go through the process yourself,” she said. “So being able to go through that process and have [guidance] was really invaluable to my academic career.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">At the end of the interview, when asked what advice she would provide to others undergraduate researchers interested in publishing their research, Myers said that she would tell others to “just go for it.” “I think it’s really important to have some feedback from a faculty member at your university beforehand, to help get some feedback before you submit, especially on the abstract and things like that,” she said. “But I also think that a lot of times as undergraduates we feel like our research isn’t worth publishing, or that we’re not experienced enough to do that, so I think undergraduate research journals provide really great opportunities and I think students should really take that opportunity to realize that they do have the expertise to be published in these types of publications.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/myers.jpg" alt="" width="185" height="193"></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Author of blog post: Sarah Smith, junior majoring in Professional Writing at York College of Pennsylvania.</span></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Edited by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</span></em></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-03-13 Meet the author: Huy Truong https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/13 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Huy Truong (he/him) is a 19-year-old biology major with an entrepreneurship minor at Penn State Berks. He emigrated to the United States from Vietnam when he was 11. Truong wrote his piece as a first-year student at Penn State - Berks.. Since he was intrigued by both art and science, he decided that a career in medical illustration would harmonize his interests.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Truong’s <em>YSW</em> article compares multiple examples of medical illustrations of the human body. He decided which illustrations to use based on time period and technology, as he wanted to showcase a little bit of everything in his piece. Truong explains, “The medieval period had a lot of inaccuracies, the Renaissance Period was when art and the human body was very appreciated, and the 21st century focuses on using technology.” Truong’s article explores the transformation of medical illustration over time. According to Truong, “these changes suggest that human anatomy illustrations adopted different rhetorical approaches as time progressed and technology became more advanced.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/woundman.jpg" alt="" width="288" height="386"></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image citation: “The Wound Man” by Pseudo Galen, <em>Fasticulus Medicinae; Welcome Collection, </em>welcomecollection.org/works/tp6fppqz</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wound Man</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> (above) is one of the images inclu</span>ded and analyzed in Truong’s paper.</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Truong wrote this piece for scholars who are interested in medical illustrations.&nbsp; He wanted to help others see the connection between art, science, and rhetoric. Furthermore, Truong wanted to showcase how medical knowledge has advanced over time to those interested in the history of medicine and rhetoric.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When asked how his writing experience with </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">was, Truong stated that he enjoyed the revision process and “learning about his future career in relation to medical illustrations and how it is greatly important to the medical field.” He said that writing his piece took a lot of time and adaptability: “The process wasn’t difficult, but it was a learning experience.” He explained, “It was hard changing the mindset from writing as a college student to a larger, scholarly audience.” Truong had to decide which images to include in his article based on those who would be reading it. He admitted making these types of decisions was a bit challenging as well, but that he was assisted with these types of choices by Dr. Gabriel Cutrufello, his <em>YSW</em> Faculty Advisory Editor.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you are considering writing for </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, Truong has this advice: “Write geared towards something you are passionate about. That way research isn't boring and you learn about something you enjoy. Also, trust the revision process, and get help from your mentors.”</span></p> <p><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/huy.jpg" alt="" width="332" height="460"></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To see more of how Huy Truong is inspired through art or to check out some of his artwork follow his Instagram @briangtruong.&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Author of Blog Post: Breanna Hoffner, Junior at York College of Pennsylvania.&nbsp;</span></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Edited by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</span></em></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-03-11 Blog: Meet the author: Brittany Halley https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/12 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When interviewed about her YSW article,“Materiality Matters: How Human Bodies and Writing Technologies Impact the Composing Process,” Brittany Halley (she/her) provided an informative, behind-the-scenes look at her writing process. Halley is an Ohio State English major, with a focus on Writing, Rhetoric, and Literacy, as well as a minor in Scandanavian Studies.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She looked at the effects that different levels of comfort, distractions, and technology have on an author’s writing and writing process. “[It started as] a small assignment for a writing, rhetoric, and literacy class,” Halley explained, when asked how she came up with the project. From there, however, she was driven by her interest in humans and the human experience. Halley’s study used multiple empirical research methods for studying writing,&nbsp; including screen recording and retrospective “think-aloud”tactics, and inductive analysis methods, to compare the experience of writing with a tablet and stylus with the experience of writing on a computer.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Going into the study , Halley thought that a phone and stylus would be the best combination for writing because of its free flow nature, but she discovered that the computer provided the best experience. “It sounds obvious, but how often are you experiencing writer's block and you’re uncomfortable with the tech or your seat?” asked Halley, when explaining her most important findings from her research.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This article is Halley’s first publication. She hopes her study helps “fill in the gap in literature” about writing technologies and individuals’ experiences with those technologies. This is what inspired her to submit her paper to </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For Halley, “time” was one of the biggest challenges she faced when conducting research and publishing her study. She became very focused on coding her data and had to shift her focus to provide adequate time for all of her goals.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Halley’s work on her article didn’t end when she submitted it. Working with </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> proved very beneficial to Halley. “I got a whole bunch out of that,” she said, when asked about her experience writing for the journal. “Being able to recognize the organization, make it flow, [having] the benefit of a second set of eyes, getting to work with people in the field to be able to fill in the gaps on the material.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Halley offered some advice when asked what she would tell undergraduates interested in submitting to </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">. “Find something that you’re interested in, and can be immersed in. If you’re not immersed in what you're researching, you won't enjoy it.” She went on to praise the experience of writing for the journal, which started as a simple assignment, but turned into a more substantial experience for her. “The </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> process is super enjoyable and an enriching experience, if anyone can do it they totally should!”</span></p> <p><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/brittanyhalley.jpg" alt="" width="210" height="208"></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Blog post by: Students in Dr. Emily Murphy Cope’s Fall 2020 Digital Writing course (WRT320 at York College of Pennsylvania).&nbsp;</span></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Edited by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</span></em></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-03-09 Blog: Meet the YSW Faculty Advisory Editor: Zhaozhe Wang https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/11 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There’s a whole team of people working behind the scenes at Young Scholars in Writing to support our undergraduate authors through the process of revising and publishing their research. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW authors don’t work alone; each of our authors is paired with a Faculty Advisory Editor, an experienced rhetoric and writing studies scholar who mentors an author through the process of revising and editing their YSW manuscript before publication. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Today, we’re introducing you to one of these important people: Zhaozhe Wang, a </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Faculty Advisory Editor.&nbsp; Zhaozhe is an expert in translingualism and a doctoral candidate at Purdue University, where he teaches first-year writing in the Department of English. Zhaozhe was the Faculty Advisory Editor for Jacob Wilson, the author of “</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Best Practices for a Translingual Pedagogy: An Undergraduate Perspec</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">tive,” </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">featured in volume 18 of </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing.&nbsp;</span></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Zhaozhe approached mentoring Jacob as building “a give-and-take relationship,” where they had conversations mutually sharing what they knew about the topic they were both so passionate about. Zhaozhe considered working with Jacob an opportunity to learn about translingualism from an undergraduate scholar’s perspective, which was refreshing and eye-opening. Their mentoring relationship was mutually beneficial and a “delightful experience.” Initially, Zhaozhe thought he might need to help Jacob find his authorial voice in the community of rhetoric and writing scholars. But Zhaozhe was “impressed by how sophisticated and well-thought-out [Jacob’s] arguments were” and claimed that he is “talented, responsive, and hardworking.”</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">During our interview, Zhaozhe explained that </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> serves the field of rhetoric and writing studies by creating a platform for undergraduate students to grow and share their research. He asked, “How ironic would it be if we build our reputation on researching about writing at the postsecondary level yet did not create a space for postsecondary writers to showcase their work?”&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While it can be intimidating for writers to put their work out there for the whole world to see, Zhaozhe encourages undergraduate researchers to “just submit it. Be confident and take ownership of your writing. Do not wait until you write a perfect piece to submit it because you will never do [that]… you have to take the first step and learn the conventions of the process by trial and error.”</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Zhaozhe discovered his own drive for writing when he was in middle school in China. He used a journal assignment of a weekly 800-character essay as a platform to share his thoughts on social issues from his perspective. He kept journal writing as a personal habit until college, where he could look back on all of his handwritten essays and reflect on his progress. Zhaozhe jokes that at one time he attempted to write a novel, eagerly awaiting weekends to have uninterrupted time to work on his “masterpiece.” Although the novel was shelved twenty-thousand words in due to mounting schoolwork, he looks back on the memory fondly.&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When he began his graduate studies in the United States, he quickly learned that writing in genres other than novels, poems, or newspaper articles can also develop into a profession. He learned not only how to write in English, his second language, but dedicated himself to contributing as a researcher to the field of rhetoric and writing studies.</span></p> <p><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/wangzhaozhe-square.jpg" alt="" width="250" height="250"></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Author of blog post: Jena Bixler, senior at York College of Pennsylvania, expected to graduate in May 2021. Bixler has a major in Graphic Design and a minor in Art History.&nbsp;</span></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Edited by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</span></em></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-03-06 Blog: Meet the author: Jacob Wilson https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/10 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Jacob Wilson shows his passion for translingualism in his manuscript, “Best Practices for a Translingual Pedagogy: An Undergraduate Perspective.” Jacob, a recent graduate of Portland State University, spent many terms throughout his college career drafting and revising the research article in which he discusses the need for introducing more translingualism into composition studies. We interviewed Jacob to learn more about his experience researching this topic, writing his article, and submitting his work to</span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Young Scholars in Writing.</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As an undergraduate, Jacob double majored in Spanish and English; however, his love for languages began long before college. He remembers learning Spanish from a very early age and was enrolled in a dual-language curriculum up until the eighth grade. Jacob explained that he “developed a more nuanced understanding of language, but one that was still separated between English and Spanish, and there weren’t a lot of opportunities to mesh them together.” However, when he learned about translingualism in a composition theory course in college, he became interested in the idea of blending his love of Spanish and English in the context of writing pedagogy. Although Jacob originally intended to write his research paper for an undergraduate thesis, he decided to expand his writing after receiving guidance from his academic mentor, Dr. Kathryn Comer, who introduced him to academic journals focused on composition pedagogy </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">. Since he planned to attend graduate school after graduation, he hoped writing a manuscript for publication would help him determine if this sort of work would interest him in the future.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite being intrigued by his research topic, Jacob Jacob struggled to remain focused on the same project for many academic terms. He explained that, unlike his writing assignments for school that only took one term to complete, his YSW manuscript required constant drafting and revision throughout multiple terms of his senior year.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">His work didn’t end after </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">accepted his article</span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">. </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Upon acceptance, Jacob was assigned a Faculty Advisory Editor who would serve as his mentor through the revision and editing process. Jacob’s Faculty Advisory Editor was Zhaozhe Wang, a graduate student in rhetoric and composition at Purdue University. Jacob explained that having Zhaozhe as a mentor was “a great way to talk to someone who was an expert in translingualism and second language writing.” Despite the distance between them, Jacob and Zhaozhe collaborated well online. The bond they formed helped Jacob connect to someone well-versed in his area of study, and he found someone he can refer to in graduate school and beyond.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Currently, Jacob attends the University of Washington, where he is still studying translingualism while working towards his Ph.D. He explained that writing for </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> helped him “put on the shoes of a composition scholar, especially at such an early step in [his] career.” Because he chose to embark on this research rather than studying it for school, he had more room to make bold choices and write how he felt would best fit his study. This helped him develop “a more holistic view of writing,” not just for this manuscript but in general. This experience taught him that “writing is never finished, it’s only due,” and he stated that “even now, there are things [he] look[s] back on, and [he] would change now if [he] had more chances to revise.”</span></p> <p><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/wilsonjacob-square.jpg" alt="" width="224" height="224"></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Author of blog post: Alana Gordon, junior at York College of Pennsylvania, expected to graduate in 2022. Gordon has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Advertising.</span></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Edited by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and senior at York College of Pennsylvania, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</span></em></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-03-04 Blog: Meet the author: Gabriela Augustina Uribe https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/9 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Gabriela Augustina Uribe (she/her) grew up in a Mexican American household that only spoke English, and she always “felt self conscious about not knowing Spanish.” Her personal experiences led to her interest in monolingualism in multicultural households--that is, the practice of teaching children in a family only one language that is not native to the parents. “Communicating with family members [was] very difficult and awkward” when she was young. Her experience led her to write her article, “¿Por Qué no Sabes Español?: Pressured Monolingualism and Its Impacts on Mexican Americans,” and publish it in </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW.</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Gaby decided to research monolingualism from the perspective of Mexican Americans when she took a course about the rhetoric of language in her sophomore year. “I immediately thought [it] would be a great opportunity to explore [my] experiences more. [At] Stanford, I had conversations with friends/classmates about their similar experiences growing up monolingually, so I was really interested to see 1) the influences on parents to raise their children with only English and 2) how monolingualism impacts ethnic identity and connection to culture.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One of the most enjoyable parts of the research was collecting primary data from her mom, dad, grandma, and close friend. Gaby notes, “It was really interesting learning more about the lives of my interviewees because I’m so close with all of them. I loved hearing about their very unique experiences with language, and then also finding the common themes and emotions that thread their stories together.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It wasn’t all easy, though. Gaby found it difficult to create strong interview questions. “I needed to steer them towards the themes that I wanted them to address/speak on, but it was also important that the answers came from them, not from me. I also wanted the interviews to be casual and conversational, since I was talking with people I’m very close to,” she noted.Gaby explained how she overcame this challenge: “I worked with my professor to compile a list of questions that were really what I was trying to answer with my research. With these open-ended questions, my interviewees were able to elaborate as much as they wanted to.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Gaby decided to submit her article to </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">because of the encouragement&nbsp; of her professor, Dr. Jennifer Johnson. Johnson taught the course, “The Rhetoric of Language, Identity, and Power,” that got Gaby thinking about her topic. As a Mechanical Engineering major, Gaby had never thought she might be recognized for her writing, since she usually deals in the quantitative fields of mathematics and science. “Dr. Johnson was so encouraging throughout the whole process of developing my research project while I was in her class,” and noted that she developed a newfound confidence that led her to submit her article to </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW.&nbsp;</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Having her article printed in </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">was very exciting for Gaby. As a STEM student, she had “ never felt like writing was something for which [she] would be recognized, so finding out [her] article was accepted was a great feeling that filled [her] with a lot of pride.” Of course, she was not alone during the publishing process, she had support from her </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Faculty Advisory Editor, Rebekah Sims, a graduate student at Purdue University. Gaby enjoyed working with Rebekah and the other </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> editors, noting that “they both had great suggestions in terms of restructuring/adding to my paper that I feel made it much stronger. It was so helpful discussing ideas with them, especially when it came to diving deeper into my primary research and utilizing the interviews to the best of my ability.” Gaby collaborated with the YSW team online, utilizing Google documents and email.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Gaby explains that her study is important “because everyone’s personal identity is important. Especially in the past few years when there has been more blatant anti-immigrant, anti-foreign language sentiment, it is important to recognize the pressures that parents feel to make sure their children know English perfectly. I think everyone should have the chance to feel truly connected to their culture and have a strong sense of identity, and for Mexican-Americans who grow up not knowing Spanish, this can sometimes be much more difficult.” Gaby hopes that her study will contribute to real-world changes, such as K-12 schools adjusting their teaching practices “to be more supportive of students who know other languages besides English, which higher education institutions have been encouraged to do for decades.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Gaby encourages undergraduates who are considering submitting their research to </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">to find a project they are excited about. This will “make it so much easier to push through challenges and keep improving the article,” she said. She also wanted to note that articles don’t need to be perfect when submitted, “as long as you have a project that you’re passionate about, have worked hard to develop, and feel good about the paper itself, submit it to </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">. The editors will help you so much in refining what you already have.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/uribe.jpg" alt="" width="272" height="263"></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><em>Edited by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and Senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</em></span></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-03-02 Blog: Meet the author: Jessica Brown https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/8 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Jessica Brown (she/her) began her journey of creating an article for </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> when taking an undergraduate course at Marquette University that focused on the intersection of linguistics and social justice. Brown’s </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> article, “Identifying and Categorizing Language Discrimination in the Legal Field,”</span> <span style="font-weight: 400;">draws on interviews with attorneys to examine the language discrimination that non-standard English speakers face in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Her fascination with the concept of language discrimination as a legal issue combined with her drive to enter the legal profession was the origin of her writing on the topic. Brown is now a first-year law student at Marquette University Law School.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brown believes her research on language discrimination is important because she can use what she has learned in her future legal career. Through the interviews she conducted with the three attorneys, she realized just how widespread the discrimination of non-standard English is. She said that “as a future lawyer, [she] was able to learn about how linguistic discrimination manifests and what it looks like.” She now feels more understanding of how to treat those who do not speak standard English and more confident that she could effectively defend them.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Convinced by her mentor Dr. Jenn Fishman to eventually share her work with </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, Brown spent several years working on this project. While researching and writing this article, Brown built up her skills in research and expanded her knowledge. In addition to reading the existing scholarship on language discrimination, Brown conducted qualitative interviews with three attorneys. She then analyzed her transcripts of these interviews and learned how to use qualitative coding methods to identify patterns in the interviews.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brown emphasized that writing for </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> was notably different than previous projects in college. A few of these differences were being able to focus on a topic that she picked herself and organizing research in her own way. Working on the article for about a year, she was able to be more thoughtful in her research while also feeling more relaxed in her schedule. On the other hand, Brown experienced stress during the research and publication process, especially because she was simultaneously preparing for law school and dealing with the sudden COVID-19 pandemic. Brown explained that her mentor was important in helping her overcome these obstacles and learn new skills. “This was my first independent research project, so naturally there was a lot to learn…. my weekly meetings with my mentor helped me to stay on track,” she said of Dr. Fishman.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Initially, Brown was nervous about submitting her project for publication. However, by the time she finished her article, she only had positive things to say about everyone she had worked with at the journal. Brown discovered that the </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> staff was a group of kind people who were understanding towards her whenever she hit obstacles in the research or writing process. She and her </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> faculty advisory editor, Dr. Steve Price (Professor of Writing and English Secondary Education at Mississippi College), worked together to set goals that kept her motivated to move through her project. Brown wants other undergraduates to know, “Submitting your work [to </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">] is a great and rewarding experience, and I promise you won’t regret it!”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/brown.jpg" alt="" width="213" height="317"></span></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by: Patrick Czawlytko, Public History major at York College of Pennsylvania.</span></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Edited by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and Senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</span></em></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-02-27 Blog: Meet the author: Hannah Cox https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/7 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hannah Cox (she/her) is an undergraduate student at the University of Alaska, Anchorage. Cox’s </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> article</span> <span style="font-weight: 400;">“</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Language and Dehumanization in Alaskan Japanese Internment Documents”</span> <span style="font-weight: 400;">discusses governmental documents related to Japanese Alaskans in Alaska’s Digital Archives. Cox was initially interested in Alaska during World War II, which led to her digging through the archives and becoming interested in the internment of Japanese Alaskans.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In an interview, Hannah Cox was asked about the most important piece of information she found during her research. She said it was the comparison between the letter written by Michael Hagiwara, a Japanese Alaskan, and the governmental documents that she had studied for the article. The government documents disregarded the Japanese Alaskans as U.S citizens, and this comparison helped Hannah see the dehumanizing nature of the government. “[Hagiwara’s letter] suggests that Japanese Alaskans viewed themselves as citizens of Alaska and the US, worthy of rights and due process, while the other documents of the file rarely admit this,” says Hannah. This was important to Hannah’s study because it allowed her to grasp a better understanding of the documents as a whole and understand the contrast between the Japanese internment and government documents.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The most surprising finds during Hannah’s research were all of the examples of humanization of Japanese Alaskans by the government, and how they showed a problematic disconnect between the consciences of government officials and their actions in implementing the Japanese internment. She mentions that the officials see Japanese Alaskans as people with homes, families, and businesses, but this did not affect their politics or the internment. Hannah states, “this was surprising to me, but also helped me consider that dehumanizing language could be playing a role in helping officials justify the Japanese internment to themselves.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hannah felt this study was important because it ties back to a historical event that both Alaskan and broader US citizens forget about, or deliberately avoid. Hannah said that she had very little exposure to information about the Japanese internment before she started this project. She believed that it was important to make this piece of history visible so that the racist and inhuman acts will not be repeated. Hannah stated, “Illuminating the power of language in this instance may help with our understanding of how even the ways we name and categorize ourselves and other people can have a profound impact on human life.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hannah submitted her article to <em>Young Scholars in Writing</em> because the professor of the class that she originally wrote the article for, Dr. Stone, recommended it. She had never heard of <em>Young Scholars in Writing</em> until Dr. Stone brought it to her attention, which made her determined to publish her work and experience the process of publishing an academic paper. Hannah’s original article was much too long for <em>Young Scholars in Writing</em>, and she had to make some very drastic changes during the editing process. To help the focus of her argument and the length of the article, an entire section had to be cut, and other sections were trimmed and condensed. Hannah said that most of the feedback she received focused on helping her, rework, consolidate, and make the necessary cuts to sections of her paper to help clarify her argument.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hannah noted the difference between college projects that she had worked on in the past versus the article she wrote for </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW. </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">She says that it had the most versions any of her projects has ever had during the editing process. She made many heavy edits before submitting to <em>Young Scholars in Writing</em>, as well as afterward in order to make it clearer and more concise. She mentions how most college projects do not require heavy editing such as this, since the audience remains small and the writing is not being published.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hannah advises students thinking about submitting their work to </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">&nbsp; to not “feel like the first draft you submit needs to be perfect. If you put in the work and have good content, that’s most important. It doesn’t hurt to submit something that’s too long, so long as you’re willing to cut – it’s a lot easier to cut content than to write new content.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/hannahcoxpic.jpg" alt="" width="248" height="282"></span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by: Taylor Groft, Professional Writing major at York College of Pennsylvania.</span></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Edited by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and Senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</span></em></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-02-25 Blog: Meet the author: Samantha J. Rae https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/6 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">During an interview with Samantha Rae, published author of Young Scholars in Writing, we gained a behind-the-scenes look into the research and writing process for her article, “Tales in Language, Confidence, and Learning Environments: Exploring Students’ Mental Health Through Literacy Narratives.” Rae recently graduated with a BA in Rhetoric and Composition from Georgia State University. She is currently a first-year MA student in Rhetoric and Composition at Georgia State University, with a goal of teaching at the university level.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rae’s initial interest in the topic of student mental health came from a personal perspective. “I heard my own opinions of the inefficiency of campus mental health resources echoed in several of my classmates,” she explained. From that point on, Rae considered her own previous work with the Digital Archives of Literacy Narratives (DALN) and the ways that narrative may or may not serve to help students create a more personal discourse through which mental health issues can be discussed.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Her article began as the final project for a rhetoric and composition course she took, which focused primarily on writing for community engagement. With the encouragement she got from her professor, Rae saw the submission as an opportunity to share her work with a broader audience and hopefully spark a conversation that continues to spread student mental health rhetoric and increase literacy. Throughout the editorial process, Rae’s faculty advisory editor was Dr. Sarah Singer, an Assistant Professor at the University of Central Florida. “We had the best communication and she helped me flesh out all of the ideas that I had for the revision of this article with such care and concern,” Samantha said.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The greatest joy that Rae had while conducting this research was learning to be open to findings that challenged her own assumptions. She learned to sit with the archives and allow the narratives to speak for themselves, instead of focusing primarily on her own preliminary goals for her project. The biggest challenge that Rae faced while working on her project was using search terms that were too narrow. “I initially considered only literacy narratives that explicitly or exclusively talked about depression,” she explained. But then, she “started to think of other factors that might affect issues with mental health [such as] fear, anxiety, anger, [and] addiction.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The process of conducting research has helped Rae better define her scholarly areas of interest for her future career in the field of rhetoric and composition. The experience that she gained throughout the revision process of her paper was also a great way for her to prepare for writing and research as a graduate student. When asked if she had any advice for students who may be hesitant to submit their own work to </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, Rae said to just do it. “I remember feeling apprehensive (more so self-conscious) when my professor first introduced the idea to me,” Rae explained. “So my advice for other undergraduates is to be open to the experience of working with great mentors to revise their papers and prepare them for more work with their research interests.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rae believes that it is important to support research conducted by undergraduate students. After all, the next generation of research in the field of rhetoric and composition all comes from the concerns and interests of up-and-coming students.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/samantharae.jpg" alt="" width="504" height="676"></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Edited by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and Senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</span></em></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-02-23 Blog: Meet the author: Anna Maltbie https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/5 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When interviewed about her </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">YSW</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> article “‘Stories for Reproductive Freedom:’ A Rhetorical Analysis of Storytelling on NARAL Pro-Choice America’s Website,” Anna Maltbie (she/her), took us behind-the-scenes of her writing process. When she submitted this article to YSW, Maltbie was an undergraduate at Miami University of Ohio, majoring in English Literature, Professional Writing, and Economics. She is currently pursuing a Master of Science in Business Management, hoping to enter the business side of publishing or work for a nonprofit organization.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For this YSW article, Maltbie researched thirty-three different stories about womens’ experiences with abortion access. She chose to research this topic for her paper because abortion rights are a “heavily discussed debate in American politics for years” and a social movement she is passionate about.Maltbie focused on the NARAL Pro Choice America website (</span><a href="https://www.prochoiceamerica.org"><span style="font-weight: 400;">https://www.prochoiceamerica.org</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">) “because of its prominence in the movement.” The website also provided Maltbie with the thirty-three stories that she then analyzed.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When reflecting on her research process, she explained that it was a “difficult process to read about, because of the traumatic experiences the women had experienced.” But since her topic was about the effectiveness of storytelling to generate </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">pathos</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> in the pro-choice movement, she knew her emotional reaction was a sign that her article had merit and needed to be written. What Maltbie found most enjoyable about writing was creating her own explanatory scheme based on her dataset and color-coding for each article.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As an undergraduate, Maltbie wanted to feel “the joy of being published before [she] graduate[d].”&nbsp; One of her professors is currently a faculty advisory editor with&nbsp; </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">and encouraged his students to submit their research to YSW. She explained, “I’ve been a reader, business manager, and editor-in-chief for an undergraduate literary magazine for four years, so I had a lot of experience on the other side of publishing but [have not had] any of my own work published. I was a Senior and figured since I spent four years writing in my literature and professional writing classes, I might as well try to get something I was proud of published.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Maltbie’s faculty advisory editor, the person who coaches each author through the YSW revision process,was Dr. Sarah E. Polo, assistant professor of English at Cottey College. They collaborated through Google Docs and email. They also used a video call to introduce themselves and go through the initial edits of her article. “I appreciated her clear communication about what needed to be done and when as well as her quick responses,” Maltbie noted.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Maltbie advises undergraduate students who may be interested in submitting work to </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> to “Just Do It [please don’t sue me, Nike]. The best outcome is you get your work published, and the worst is your article is rejected and you don’t need to do any extra work.”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/annamaltbie.jpg" alt="" width="275" height="374"></span></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Edited by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and Senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</span></em></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-02-20 Volume 19: CFP https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/4 <p>233<img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/gcutrufello/1.png" alt="" width="1545" height="2000"></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/gcutrufello/2.png" alt="" width="1545" height="2000"></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-02-18 Blog: Meet the author: Megan Kelley https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/3 <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">#youknowme&nbsp;</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“One out of four women in the United States has had an abortion...you can’t say you don’t know someone who has had an abortion because... you know me.” (Busy Phillips 2019)<img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/getoutofmyuterus.png" alt="A protester holds up a sign reading &quot;get out of my uterus.&quot;" width="427" height="244"></span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Source: </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sini, Rozina. “Alabama Abortion Bill Ignites Women’s Stories with #youknowme.” </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">BBC News</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, 16 May 2019, www.bbc.com/news/48286795.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Megan Kelley (she/her) is a 22-year-old alumna from Miami University of Oxford, Ohio, who graduated in May 2020. Kelley majored in Public Health and double minored in Political Science and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Since she graduated, she has been working on her Master’s degree in Gerontology. Prior to her graduation, Kelley submitted her writing piece, </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Use #youknowme and share your truth": Rhetoric of Digital Abortion Storytelling</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, emphasizing the reproductive rights movement to </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing.</span></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">&nbsp;</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Kelley originally wrote this piece for a Rhetoric of Social Movement Class, and afterward, her professor suggested that she submit her paper to the journal. Kelley’s piece emphasizes the reproductive justice movement. She “wanted to do something more contemporary.” Kelley chose to write about&nbsp; #youknowme because (1) it wasn’t well-known, (2) it was on Twitter (where Kelley often spends her time), and (3) it was in the realm of what she was interested in.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This paper looks at how the #YouKnowMe movement encouraged Twitter users to share their personal stories, experiences, and emotions associated with their abortions. Feminist movements have utilized consciousness-raising by relying on women to share their personal experiences to further support the efforts of the larger movement. The #YouKnowMe movement brings consciousness-raising into the digital sphere.” ~ Excerpt from Kelley’s Paper, </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Use #youknowme and share your truth: Rhetoric of Digital Abortion Storytelling."&nbsp;</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img src="https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/public/site/images/bliberatore/megankelley.png" alt="Megan Kelley looking at the camera and smiling" width="100" height="134"></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Kelley noted that the bulk of her time spent writing her piece was used during the process of compiling tweets. She also relied on news articles and prior knowledge from her minor in women’s studies. Kelley wrote this piece to emphasize the importance of reproductive rights. She said that “reproductive rights are very salient right now- and definitely important to people [considering] this political climate.” Kelley explained that her piece is meant for a younger audience. She admits that it is more for individuals who are interested in and open to abortion/ reproductive justice topics. She adds, “I doubt you would want to read my piece if you are super religious [or]pro-life.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Kelley worked through the writing process of this piece with her classmates. Since this piece was originally for a class project, she received feedback from her classmates and her professor, Dr. Jason Palmeri, who helped her in class and as a mentor throughout the submission process. A challenge that Kelley faced was scaling down how many tweets she analyzed to choose which specific tweets she would be using. Another challenge Kelley faced was writing an abstract, since she had never written one before. She found this portion of the paper especially challenging. When asked what her least favorite parts of the writing process were, Kelley explained that writing the introduction was difficult, and scrolling through a large volume of tweets became monotonous. She continued to say that, although there were definitely challenges she had to face, there were also many inspiring parts to her writing. Kelley noted, “My favorite part was reading these women’s stories: some were so powerful, they had me crying.”&nbsp; When asked how difficult it was to submit through the </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing Journal, </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Kelley explained that if she had to complete the paper from scratch, the difficulty level would be a 6 on a scale from one to ten. Kelley’s advice for anyone considering wanting to publish their piece through the </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Young Scholars in Writing</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Journal is to “Pick a topic that is relevant and popular but not overdone.” Then she added, “Also, just go for it. The worst they can say is no.”&nbsp;</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Author of Blog Post: Madelina Marquez, Senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Marquez has a major in Biology and a double minor in Chemistry and Professional Writing.&nbsp;</span></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Edited by: Beck Liberatore, YSW Intern and Senior at York College of PA, expected to graduate in May 2021. Liberatore has a major in Professional Writing and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies.</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Thanks to:</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Megan Kelley's interview &amp; paper: "Use #youknowme and share your truth: Rhetoric of Digital Abortion Storytelling"</span></p> Young Scholars in Writing 2021-02-18 Volume 19 Submissions Now Open https://youngscholarsinwriting.org/index.php/ysiw/announcement/view/2 Young Scholars in Writing 2020-12-10