Challenging Our Labels: Rejecting the Language of Remediation

  • Brisa Galindo California State University - San Bernardino
  • Sonia Castaneda California State University - San Bernardino
  • Esther Gutierrez California State University - San Bernardino
  • Arturo E. Tejada, Jr. California State University - San Bernardino
  • DeShonna Wallace California State University - San Bernardino

Abstract

For the past ten years, more than 60% of incoming freshmen have been placed in English courses labeled “remedial” at California State University, San Bernardino. Most published articles about this statistic have been written by professional educators; little has been said by the people experiencing it firsthand. We five were not happy with the consequences of these placements and wanted our voices to be heard. We did research and put ourselves in situations where we could gain more knowledge about the practices and language of remediation. We were shocked to discover how many people are ignorant of the definition or meaning of remediation. We add our scholarship to challenge this view of students and the language used to describe them.

Author Biographies

Brisa Galindo, California State University - San Bernardino

Brisa Galindo will graduate from California State University, San Bernardino, in the winter of 2016 with a BS in Marketing. She recently spoke at the CCCC and the IWCA conferences about the effects of remediation on students and intends to continue research in this area. She plans to pursue a career as a research market analyst.

Sonia Castaneda, California State University - San Bernardino

Sonia Castaneda will graduate from California State University, San Bernardino, in fall 2015 with a BA in Social Work. She plans on pursuing a master’s degree in Social Work, concentrating in child protection. Sonia is currently working on getting into the social work program.

Esther Gutierrez, California State University - San Bernardino

Esther Gutierrez will graduate California State University, San Bernardino, in the spring of 2015 with a BA in English. She plans on pursuing her PhD in either Linguistics or Composition and Rhetoric. Esther is currently working as a tutor for the CSUSB Writing Center.

Arturo E. Tejada, Jr., California State University - San Bernardino

Arturo E. Tejada, Jr. will graduate California State University, San Bernardino, in 2016 with a BA in English. He plans on pursuing his PhD in order to become an English professor. He has spoken at the CCCC and IWCA conferences, and he won the 2012 First Year Writing Contest at CSUSB for his paper “Remediation: The Real Meaning behind the Term.”

DeShonna Wallace, California State University - San Bernardino

DeShonna Wallace studied two years at California State University, San Bernardino, and is currently a student at Northwestern State University in Louisiana. She plans to graduate in 2016 with a BS in Nursing and continue her education to become a nurse practitioner. She spoke on remediation at the CCCC and IWCA conferences and is very pleased with the benefits of her work on the issue.

Published
2015-09-15
Section
Articles